About

About The Blog

I’m blogging about myself, my life, and my ideas.

I do not control the ads. Ads about autism may say… iffy… things. Please feel free to report an ad if you think it is promoting something of dubious ethics.

About Me

My name is Luna. I am an autistic young adult. I was diagnosed at age 18. My interests include writing and drawing. You may have seen me around before. And don’t worry, wikiHow does have permission to use my artwork.

I’m very close to my family, and occasionally I write about my sister Katie, who has Down syndrome.

About my disabilities:

  • Please call me “autistic,” not a “person with autism.” Being autistic is part of my identity.
  • I am apparently borderline inattentive type ADHD.
  • I struggle with mental illnesses including anxiety, depression, and complex PTSD. I go to therapy and take medication to help manage this.
  • Please don’t assume I’m “high-functioning” because I can type.

People like to make fun of me on forums like Reddit and Kiwi Farms. If you see this, please do not tell me about it. I’m trying to develop healthy self-esteem to fight my mental illness, and thinking about haters is… counterproductive to that goal.

My Positions

I’m going to use bulleted lists for readability.

On autism:

  • Autism is a disability.
  • Autistic people deserve respect, acceptance, and accommodation.
  • Since autism is inborn, a “cure” would likely mean selectively aborting autistic fetuses. I don’t support that.
  • Instead of preventing our existence, researchers should focus on quality of life supports, co-occurring conditions (like epilepsy), and finding ways to make the world more autistic-friendly.
  • Good therapy helps us be happier, healthier, and more skilled. It does not train us to act “normal” or adopt unhealthy behaviors (e.g. hiding distress) for others’ convenience.
  • If someone can’t speak, that is what AAC is for. Everyone should have a voice.
  • We should have a say in how we are treated.
  • High-support autistics deserve to be included in the conversation.
  • Hating on high-support autistics is not okay. Full stop.
  • We need all the help we can get. Non-autistic allies, such as parents, can be amazing supporters. It’s OK for them to ask questions, and we should be understanding if they make a well-meaning mistake.
  • I support the neurodiversity movement.

On intersectionality:

  • I’m a feminist.
  • I support LGBTQIA+ people, and don’t gatekeep.
  • I think it’s important to include women, people of color, LGBTQ+ people, people with disabilities, and other marginalized groups.
  • I’m pro choice. (I dislike abortion but don’t believe in forcing people to be pregnant against their will. I think the pro life movement fails to use research-based methods to reduce abortions.)
  • I may make mistakes or say insensitive things by accident. If so, please tell me so that I can fix and learn from my error.

I have no interest in arguing with people who do not respect me, or who do not respect other human beings. You aren’t “edgy” or “original” or “honest about the hardships that autism causes for burdened family members,” just boring and kind of a jerk. You have a million other places to share your obnoxious opinions. Consider this a “no trespassing” sign.

Advertisements